Category Archives: Duveen Studio Recordings

Sophie Orlando: A Critical Response to Tate Encounters as a Transdisciplinary Project

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Respondents: Tate Encounters Research Team

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Art and Politics: Uncertain Practices
Programme D

Co-chairs: Mike Phillips and Victoria Walsh
Monday 16 March – Friday 20 March 2009

Three years ago the research project Tate Encounters

Tate Encounters
set out a number of original research aims which explicitly bound together the spheres of politics and art. Indeed on many accounts, from within the recently established field of museum studies, the foundation and dynamic of the museum is essentially that of a politics of the public and as such the Tate Encounters research programme is fundamentally a study in cultural politics. Firstly it framed Tate’s role in holding the National Collection of British Art at Tate Britain as a practice of the political representation of nation.  Secondly, it framed government cultural diversity policy as a politics of civil society.

After two years of fieldwork Tate Encounters is in the process of elaborating a number of understandings about the ways in which Tate Britain produces and reproduces itself and its audience organisationally and how a group of voluntary participants with migrant backgrounds engaged with and made sense of Tate Britain as audience members. In this respect, Tate Britain has been understood as a cultural site and a potential ‘contact zone’ in negotiating transcultural, generational and class identities.

The project now aims to locate these emergent findings in the wider context of enumerating the recent history of the development of cultural diversity policy and to understand its politics and cultural outcomes. This programme aims to critically scrutinise the intellectual and political roots of cultural diversity policy through examining understandings of the politics of the policy process, and the ways in which museums responded to diversity policy. In addition, it wishes to look at the impact of a changing social demographic upon traditional cultural institutions in relationship to contemporary cultural forms of expression.

In more detail the programme. is interested in examining received thinking about multiculturalism, cultural pluralism and cultural diversity as a way of identifying both older limits and new possibilities for progressive cultural change. In doing this the project recognises the need to look at the ways in which such debates were informed by intellectual and practical thinking about race and ethnicity.

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The Changing Status of Difference: Cultural Policy 1970 to present

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Chair: Mike Phillps
Respondent: Andrew Dewdney

  • Munira Mirza, Director of Policy, Arts, Culture and the Creative Industries, Greater London Authority
  • Sandy Nairne, Director, National Portrait Gallery
  • Lola Young, independent consultant, Cultural Brokers
Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

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This recording is part of:

Art and Politics: Uncertain Practices
Programme D

Co-chairs: Mike Phillips and Victoria Walsh
Monday 16 March – Friday 20 March 2009

Three years ago the research project Tate Encounters set out a number of original research aims which explicitly bound together the spheres of politics and art. Indeed on many accounts, from within the recently established field of museum studies, the foundation and dynamic of the museum is essentially that of a politics of the public and as such the Tate Encounters research programme is fundamentally a study in cultural politics. Firstly it framed Tate’s role in holding the National Collection of British Art at Tate Britain as a practice of the political representation of nation.  Secondly, it framed government cultural diversity policy as a politics of civil society.

After two years of fieldwork Tate Encounters is in the process of elaborating a number of understandings about the ways in which Tate Britain produces and reproduces itself and its audience organisationally and how a group of voluntary participants with migrant backgrounds engaged with and made sense of Tate Britain as audience members. In this respect, Tate Britain has been understood as a cultural site and a potential ‘contact zone’ in negotiating transcultural, generational and class identities.

The project now aims to locate these emergent findings in the wider context of enumerating the recent history of the development of cultural diversity policy and to understand its politics and cultural outcomes. This programme aims to critically scrutinise the intellectual and political roots of cultural diversity policy through examining understandings of the politics of the policy process, and the ways in which museums responded to diversity policy. In addition, it wishes to look at the impact of a changing social demographic upon traditional cultural institutions in relationship to contemporary cultural forms of expression.

In more detail the programme. is interested in examining received thinking about multiculturalism, cultural pluralism and cultural diversity as a way of identifying both older limits and new possibilities for progressive cultural change. In doing this the project recognises the need to look at the ways in which such debates were informed by intellectual and practical thinking about race and ethnicity.

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Ambiguous Mainstreaming: The Artist’s Perspective

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Chair: Victoria Walsh
Respondent: Mike Phillips

  • Faisal Abdul’Allah, artist
  • Hew Locke, artist
  • Raimi Gbadamosi, artist

 

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Art and Politics: Uncertain Practices
Programme D

Co-chairs: Mike Phillips and Victoria Walsh
Monday 16 March – Friday 20 March 2009

Three years ago the research project Tate Encounters set out a number of original research aims which explicitly bound together the spheres of politics and art. Indeed on many accounts, from within the recently established field of museum studies, the foundation and dynamic of the museum is essentially that of a politics of the public and as such the Tate Encounters research programme is fundamentally a study in cultural politics. Firstly it framed Tate’s role in holding the National Collection of British Art at Tate Britain as a practice of the political representation of nation.  Secondly, it framed government cultural diversity policy as a politics of civil society.

After two years of fieldwork Tate Encounters is in the process of elaborating a number of understandings about the ways in which Tate Britain produces and reproduces itself and its audience organisationally and how a group of voluntary participants with migrant backgrounds engaged with and made sense of Tate Britain as audience members. In this respect, Tate Britain has been understood as a cultural site and a potential ‘contact zone’ in negotiating transcultural, generational and class identities.

The project now aims to locate these emergent findings in the wider context of enumerating the recent history of the development of cultural diversity policy and to understand its politics and cultural outcomes. This programme aims to critically scrutinise the intellectual and political roots of cultural diversity policy through examining understandings of the politics of the policy process, and the ways in which museums responded to diversity policy. In addition, it wishes to look at the impact of a changing social demographic upon traditional cultural institutions in relationship to contemporary cultural forms of expression.

In more detail the programme. is interested in examining received thinking about multiculturalism, cultural pluralism and cultural diversity as a way of identifying both older limits and new possibilities for progressive cultural change. In doing this the project recognises the need to look at the ways in which such debates were informed by intellectual and practical thinking about race and ethnicity.

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Curating Difference: Lure of the East Part 2

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Chair: Victoria Walsh
Respondent: Mike Phillips

Mark Miller, Curator, Young Peoples Programmes
Jennifer Batchelor, Curator, Interpretation
Indie Choudhury, Curator, Visual Dialogues

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

to download the file to your hard drive click here

This Recordingis part of:

Art and Politics: Uncertain Practices
Programme D

Co-chairs: Mike Phillips and Victoria Walsh
Monday 16 March – Friday 20 March 2009

Three years ago the research project Tate Encounters set out a number of original research aims which explicitly bound together the spheres of politics and art. Indeed on many accounts, from within the recently established field of museum studies, the foundation and dynamic of the museum is essentially that of a politics of the public and as such the Tate Encounters research programme is fundamentally a study in cultural politics. Firstly it framed Tate’s role in holding the National Collection of British Art at Tate Britain as a practice of the political representation of nation.  Secondly, it framed government cultural diversity policy as a politics of civil society.

After two years of fieldwork Tate Encounters is in the process of elaborating a number of understandings about the ways in which Tate Britain produces and reproduces itself and its audience organisationally and how a group of voluntary participants with migrant backgrounds engaged with and made sense of Tate Britain as audience members. In this respect, Tate Britain has been understood as a cultural site and a potential ‘contact zone’ in negotiating transcultural, generational and class identities.

The project now aims to locate these emergent findings in the wider context of enumerating the recent history of the development of cultural diversity policy and to understand its politics and cultural outcomes. This programme aims to critically scrutinise the intellectual and political roots of cultural diversity policy through examining understandings of the politics of the policy process, and the ways in which museums responded to diversity policy. In addition, it wishes to look at the impact of a changing social demographic upon traditional cultural institutions in relationship to contemporary cultural forms of expression.

In more detail the programme. is interested in examining received thinking about multiculturalism, cultural pluralism and cultural diversity as a way of identifying both older limits and new possibilities for progressive cultural change. In doing this the project recognises the need to look at the ways in which such debates were informed by intellectual and practical thinking about race and ethnicity.

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Networks and Practices of the Museum

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Chair: Victoria Walsh
Respondent: Mike Phillips

  • Professor Paul Willis,  Social/Cultural Ethnography, University of Keele
  • Professor Andrew Dewdney, Project Director, Tate Encounters
Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

to download the file to your hard drive click here
This recording is part of:

Art and Politics: Uncertain Practices
Programme D

Co-chairs: Mike Phillips and Victoria Walsh
Monday 16 March – Friday 20 March 2009

Three years ago the research project Tate Encounters set out a number of original research aims which explicitly bound together the spheres of politics and art. Indeed on many accounts, from within the recently established field of museum studies, the foundation and dynamic of the museum is essentially that of a politics of the public and as such the Tate Encounters research programme is fundamentally a study in cultural politics. Firstly it framed Tate’s role in holding the National Collection of British Art at Tate Britain as a practice of the political representation of nation.  Secondly, it framed government cultural diversity policy as a politics of civil society.

After two years of fieldwork Tate Encounters is in the process of elaborating a number of understandings about the ways in which Tate Britain produces and reproduces itself and its audience organisationally and how a group of voluntary participants with migrant backgrounds engaged with and made sense of Tate Britain as audience members. In this respect, Tate Britain has been understood as a cultural site and a potential ‘contact zone’ in negotiating transcultural, generational and class identities.

The project now aims to locate these emergent findings in the wider context of enumerating the recent history of the development of cultural diversity policy and to understand its politics and cultural outcomes. This programme aims to critically scrutinise the intellectual and political roots of cultural diversity policy through examining understandings of the politics of the policy process, and the ways in which museums responded to diversity policy. In addition, it wishes to look at the impact of a changing social demographic upon traditional cultural institutions in relationship to contemporary cultural forms of expression.

In more detail the programme. is interested in examining received thinking about multiculturalism, cultural pluralism and cultural diversity as a way of identifying both older limits and new possibilities for progressive cultural change. In doing this the project recognises the need to look at the ways in which such debates were informed by intellectual and practical thinking about race and ethnicity.

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Review of the week

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As the week of screenings and discussions draws to a close, the co-researchers will discuss the ways in which their involvement in the research process has impacted on their lives. They will be joined by Visual Anthropologist Sarah Thomas and Dr. David Dibosa. The week’s observer, Dr. Raimi Gbadamoshi will present his reflections.

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

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This recording is part of:
Programme C: Visual Culture, Transmigration and Spectatorship

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Visual Culture: Assembling an Analysis

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This session will bring together critical thinkers who have been crucial to the development of Visual Cultures. The panel will include Professor Irit Rogoff, Professor of Visual Culture, Goldsmiths College, University of London and Dr. Marquand Smith, Principal Lecturer in Visual Culture Studies, University of Westminster. They will be joined by Dr. David Dibosa and Dr. Raimi Gbadamoshi.

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

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This recording is part of:
Programme C: Visual Culture, Transmigration and Spectatorship

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Seeing on the Move: Co-researchers Presentations | Cultural Legacies

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Co-researchers Rebecca Cairns, Jacqueline Ryan and Patrick Tubridy, present their work, asking whether Tate Britain allows people with diverse backgrounds to engage with culture across generations within families.  This session will also contain a screening of an ethnographic film looking at co-researchers’ lives. It will be followed by a panel discussion with Visual Anthropologist  Sarah Thomas and Co-Investigator Dr. David Dibosa.  Dr. Raimi Gbadamoshi will present reflections on the work.

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

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Watch the films presented in this recording here: Rebecca Cairns, Jacqueline Ryan and Patrick Tubridy

This recording is part of:
Programme C: Visual Culture, Transmigration and Spectatorship

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Seeing on the Move: Co-researchers Presentations | Imaginative Journeys

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Co-researchers Mary Ampomah, Nicola Oyejobi and Deep Rajput present their work, focusing on the way that cultural institutions reflect key issues in their lives. This session will also contain a screening of an ethnographic film looking at co-researchers’ life-worlds. This session will be followed by a panel discussion with Visual Anthropologist Sarah Thomas and Co-Investigator Dr. David Dibosa. Dr. Raimi Gbadamoshi will present reflections on the work.

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

to download the file to your hard drive click here

Watch the films presented in this recording here: Deep Rajput,  Nicola Oyejobi and Mary Ampomah

This recording is part of:
Programme C: Visual Culture, Transmigration and Spectatorship

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Seeing on the Move: Co-researchers Presentations | Playful Interventions

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Co-researchers Adekunle Detokunbo-Bello and Maria Cinta Esmel Pamies present their work, looking at ways of engaging creatively with museums beyond the conventions. The screenings will be followed by a panel discussion with Visual Anthropologist  Sarah Thomas and Co-Investigator Dr. David Dibosa.  Dr. Raimi Gbadamoshi will present reflections on the work.

Watch the films presented in this recording here: Adekunle Detokunbo-Bello and Maria Cinta Esmel Pamies

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

to download the file to your hard drive click here

This recording is part of:
Programme C: Visual Culture, Transmigration and Spectatorship

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