Category Archives: Duveen Studio Recordings

Seeing on the Move: Co-researchers Presentations | Hidden Agendas?

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Co-researchers Aminah Borg-Luck and Dana Mendonca  present their work, opening up unasked questions regarding the financing of museums and the purposes behind research. The screenings will be followed by a panel discussion with Visual Anthropologist Sarah Thomas and Co-Investigator Dr. David Dibosa.  Dr. Raimi Gbadamoshi will present reflections on the work.

Watch the films presented in this recording here: Aminah Borg-Luck and Dana Mendonca

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This recording is part of:
Programme C: Visual Culture, Transmigration and Spectatorship

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Seeing on the Move: Co-researchers Presentations | Tate and its Publics

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Co-researchers Robbie Sweeny and Tracey Jordan present their work, highlighting concerns with the way cultural institutions relate to the lives of their audiences. The screenings will be followed by a panel discussion with Visual Anthropologist Sarah Thomas and Co-Investigator Dr. David Dibosa.  Dr. Raimi Gbadamoshi will present reflections on the work.

Tate and its Publics

  • Dr David Dibosa, The Engine Room, University Arts London
  • Dr Raimi Gbadamosi, Artist
  • Robbie Sweeny, Co-researcher
  • Tracey Jordan, Co-researcher
  • Sarah Thomas, Research Assistant

Taking their own experience of migration as a starting point, the co-researchers in this session take a sidelong look at Tate Britain as a national institution often regarded as the custodian of British Art. Through a series of films and slideshows, the co-researchers look at issues such as the funding of national museums, the place of popular culture, the relationship of national museums to British Imperial history and the status of research.
Co-researchers Robbie Sweeny and Tracey Jordan present their work, highlighting concerns with the way cultural institutions relate to the lives of their audiences

Watch the films in this recording here:  Tracey Jordan and Robbie Sweeny

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

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This recording is part of:

Visual Culture, Transmigration and Spectatorship
Programme C

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In conversation: The Context of Being a Co-researcher

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A central focus for Tate Encounters has been the engagement of volunteer participants in museum practices. This has involved: the viewing of exhibitions, participation in museum events, as well as visits ‘behind the scenes’. As a result of this activity, films and other visual media works have been made collaboratively with different members of the Tate Encounters Research team. Volunteer participants who generated visual media works became more fully involved in the research process and have been called ‘co-researchers’.
This session brings a group of the Tate Encounters co-researchers together with researcher Sarah Thomas, who worked closely with several of them to produce ethnographic films tracing their life-world experience. They will be joined by Dr David Dibosa and Dr Raimi Gbadamoshi.

  • Dr David Dibosa, The Engine Room, University Arts London
  • Dr Raimi Gbadamosi, Artist
  • Sarah Thomas, Research Assistant
  • Jacqueline Ryan, Co-researcher
  • Mary Ampomah, Co-researcher
  • Adekunle Detokunbo-Bello, Co-researcher
  • Tracey Jordan, Co-researcher

This session brings a group of the Tate Encounters co-researchers together with Visual Anthropologist Sarah Thomas, who worked closely with several of them to produce ethnographic films tracing their life-world experience. They will be joined by Dr David Dibosa and Dr Raimi Gbadamoshi.

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

to download the file to your hard drive click here

This recording is part of:

Visual Culture, Transmigration and Spectatorship

Programme C

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Models of practice: New Approaches to Museums Research

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  • Dr David Dibosa, The Engine Room, University Arts London
  • Dr Raimi Gbadamosi, Artist
  • Veronica Sekules, Head of Education and Research, Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, University of East Anglia
  • Professor Janet Holland, SPUR Research Institute
Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

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to download the file to your hard drive click here
This recording is part of:
Programme C: Visual Culture, Transmigration and Spectatorship

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Museums, Technology and Culture: Culture and Virtual Ecologies

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  • David Garcia, Dean of Chelsea College of Art and Design and Professor of Design for Digital Cultures, HKU
  • Charlie Gere, Head of Department and Reader in New Media Research in the Department of Media, Film, and Cultural Studies, Lancaster University
  • Kelli Dipple, Curator, Intermedia art

This session discusses the wider contexts of the museum’s position in relationship to digital and globalised culture. How will the increasing use of information technologies across a whole spectrum of social, economic and cultural activity impact upon art practice and the value of museums?

 

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

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This recording is part of:

Resolutely Analogue?: Art Museums in Digital Culture
Programme B

Monday 2 March – Friday 6 March 2009

At the outset the research project Tate Encounters chose to use new media for volunteer participants to record their own encounters with Tate Britain as well as a research tool for reflexive documentation and commentary. This took the practical form of a dedicated intranet site and the use of mobile digital recording.

In using new media the project made a number of assumptions about how undergraduate student participants used new media, how this related to the ways in which a national art museum understood the potential of new media and what the use of new media might produce as research data. Having now completed two years of fieldwork, the project is now reflecting upon its initial assumptions and raising a number of critical questions which it aims to share and extend with a wider group interested in the development of new media in relationship to museums.

Some of the initial questions relate to the following:

  • To what extent does the web visitor have agency to ‘act back’ or to ‘author’ their interactions with museum websites?
  • How is new media being conceived as an ‘interpretative’ or ‘augmenting’ dimension of the museum experience and with what effects?
  • How do museums see and understand the value of the use of personal mobile media within the museum?

These questions have been grouped under the title ‘Resolutely Analogue? Art Museums in Digital Culture’ to signal the tension between change and continuity, between new media enthusiasms and traditional museological practices. Issues such as the use of media in the gallery centered on authority and provenance, ownership and copyright, and user engagement will also be discussed throughout the week’s programme.

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Online Portals to Museums: Channels for Exchange

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This session focuses upon how museum websites operate as online portals for various constituencies of online users. How porous can museum websites be within loss of identity and focus? How are questions of value and provenance negotiated?

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

to download the file to your hard drive click here
This recording is part of:

Resolutely Analogue?: Art Museums in Digital Culture
Programme B

Monday 2 March – Friday 6 March 2009

At the outset the research project Tate Encounters chose to use new media for volunteer participants to record their own encounters with Tate Britain as well as a research tool for reflexive documentation and commentary. This took the practical form of a dedicated intranet site and the use of mobile digital recording.

In using new media the project made a number of assumptions about how undergraduate student participants used new media, how this related to the ways in which a national art museum understood the potential of new media and what the use of new media might produce as research data. Having now completed two years of fieldwork, the project is now reflecting upon its initial assumptions and raising a number of critical questions which it aims to share and extend with a wider group interested in the development of new media in relationship to museums.

Some of the initial questions relate to the following:

  • To what extent does the web visitor have agency to ‘act back’ or to ‘author’ their interactions with museum websites?
  • How is new media being conceived as an ‘interpretative’ or ‘augmenting’ dimension of the museum experience and with what effects?
  • How do museums see and understand the value of the use of personal mobile media within the museum?

These questions have been grouped under the title ‘Resolutely Analogue? Art Museums in Digital Culture’ to signal the tension between change and continuity, between new media enthusiasms and traditional museological practices. Issues such as the use of media in the gallery centered on authority and provenance, ownership and copyright, and user engagement will also be discussed throughout the week’s programme.

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New Media and Museums: Channels for the Future

 

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  • Will Gompertz, Director, Tate Media
  • Damien Whitmore. Director of Communications, Victoria & Albert Museum

This session focuses upon the growing relationship between art and media, specifically upon the possibilities presented by online transmission for museums to take on new roles as producers and broadcasters of media.

 

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

to download the file to your hard drive click here

This recording is part of: 

Resolutely Analogue?: Art Museums in Digital Culture
Programme B

Monday 2 March – Friday 6 March 2009

At the outset the research project Tate Encounters chose to use new media for volunteer participants to record their own encounters with Tate Britain as well as a research tool for reflexive documentation and commentary. This took the practical form of a dedicated intranet site and the use of mobile digital recording.

In using new media the project made a number of assumptions about how undergraduate student participants used new media, how this related to the ways in which a national art museum understood the potential of new media and what the use of new media might produce as research data. Having now completed two years of fieldwork, the project is now reflecting upon its initial assumptions and raising a number of critical questions which it aims to share and extend with a wider group interested in the development of new media in relationship to museums.

Some of the initial questions relate to the following:

  • To what extent does the web visitor have agency to ‘act back’ or to ‘author’ their interactions with museum websites?
  • How is new media being conceived as an ‘interpretative’ or ‘augmenting’ dimension of the museum experience and with what effects?
  • How do museums see and understand the value of the use of personal mobile media within the museum?

These questions have been grouped under the title ‘Resolutely Analogue? Art Museums in Digital Culture’ to signal the tension between change and continuity, between new media enthusiasms and traditional museological practices. Issues such as the use of media in the gallery centered on authority and provenance, ownership and copyright, and user engagement will also be discussed throughout the week’s programme.

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New Media and the Museum: Practices and Possibilities

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* Sarah Cook, Research Fellow for the Faculty of Arts, Design and Media at University of Sunderland

* Ross Parry, Lecturer in Museums and New Media at the University of Leicester Programme Director of Museum Studies at University of Leicester
[ click here for presentation ]

This session will focus upon the ways in which new media has been taken up and used within museums. It explores how new media practices become objects to be curated, collected and archived within museums, as well as designing new media objects for interpretation and education within museums

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

to download the file to your hard drive click here
This recording is part of:

Resolutely Analogue?: Art Museums in Digital Culture
Programme B

Monday 2 March – Friday 6 March 2009

At the outset the research project Tate Encounters chose to use new media for volunteer participants to record their own encounters with Tate Britain as well as a research tool for reflexive documentation and commentary. This took the practical form of a dedicated intranet site and the use of mobile digital recording.

In using new media the project made a number of assumptions about how undergraduate student participants used new media, how this related to the ways in which a national art museum understood the potential of new media and what the use of new media might produce as research data. Having now completed two years of fieldwork, the project is now reflecting upon its initial assumptions and raising a number of critical questions which it aims to share and extend with a wider group interested in the development of new media in relationship to museums.

Some of the initial questions relate to the following:

  • To what extent does the web visitor have agency to ‘act back’ or to ‘author’ their interactions with museum websites?
  • How is new media being conceived as an ‘interpretative’ or ‘augmenting’ dimension of the museum experience and with what effects?
  • How do museums see and understand the value of the use of personal mobile media within the museum?

These questions have been grouped under the title ‘Resolutely Analogue? Art Museums in Digital Culture’ to signal the tension between change and continuity, between new media enthusiasms and traditional museological practices. Issues such as the use of media in the gallery centered on authority and provenance, ownership and copyright, and user engagement will also be discussed throughout the week’s programme.

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Networks of Users: Communities and Interests

 

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Marc Garret, Net and new media artist
Matt Locke, Commissioning Editor for Education and New Media at Channel 4
Anna Colin, Exhibitions curator, Gasworks
Honor Harger, Artist and curator

This session focuses upon new media practitioners who have looked beyond the context of the museum and gallery in generating a presence for innovatory, independent practice on the Intranet and with what consequences and outcomes.

 

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

to download the file to your hard drive click here

This Recording is part of: 

 

Resolutely Analogue?: Art Museums in Digital Culture
Programme B

Monday 2 March – Friday 6 March 2009

At the outset the research project Tate Encounters chose to use new media for volunteer participants to record their own encounters with Tate Britain as well as a research tool for reflexive documentation and commentary. This took the practical form of a dedicated intranet site and the use of mobile digital recording.

In using new media the project made a number of assumptions about how undergraduate student participants used new media, how this related to the ways in which a national art museum understood the potential of new media and what the use of new media might produce as research data. Having now completed two years of fieldwork, the project is now reflecting upon its initial assumptions and raising a number of critical questions which it aims to share and extend with a wider group interested in the development of new media in relationship to museums.

Some of the initial questions relate to the following:

  • To what extent does the web visitor have agency to ‘act back’ or to ‘author’ their interactions with museum websites?
  • How is new media being conceived as an ‘interpretative’ or ‘augmenting’ dimension of the museum experience and with what effects?
  • How do museums see and understand the value of the use of personal mobile media within the museum?

These questions have been grouped under the title ‘Resolutely Analogue? Art Museums in Digital Culture’ to signal the tension between change and continuity, between new media enthusiasms and traditional museological practices. Issues such as the use of media in the gallery centered on authority and provenance, ownership and copyright, and user engagement will also be discussed throughout the week’s programme.

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Artists Using Digital Tools: Social subjects and Digital Aesthetics

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  • Graham Harwood, Artist and educator
  • Gary Stuart, Head of Multimedia at Iniva since
  • Roshini Kempadoo, New media artist, photographer and Reader in Media Practice at University of East London

This session looks at new media art projects which have had a relationship to gallery and museum exhibition and asks questions about how artists working with new media understand the context of  working within contemporary art context and what their experience has been.

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

to download the file to your hard drive click here

 

This recording is part of:

Resolutely Analogue?: Art Museums in Digital Culture
Programme B

Monday 2 March – Friday 6 March 2009

At the outset the research project Tate Encounters chose to use new media for volunteer participants to record their own encounters with Tate Britain as well as a research tool for reflexive documentation and commentary. This took the practical form of a dedicated intranet site and the use of mobile digital recording.

In using new media the project made a number of assumptions about how undergraduate student participants used new media, how this related to the ways in which a national art museum understood the potential of new media and what the use of new media might produce as research data. Having now completed two years of fieldwork, the project is now reflecting upon its initial assumptions and raising a number of critical questions which it aims to share and extend with a wider group interested in the development of new media in relationship to museums.

Some of the initial questions relate to the following:

  • To what extent does the web visitor have agency to ‘act back’ or to ‘author’ their interactions with museum websites?
  • How is new media being conceived as an ‘interpretative’ or ‘augmenting’ dimension of the museum experience and with what effects?
  • How do museums see and understand the value of the use of personal mobile media within the museum?

These questions have been grouped under the title ‘Resolutely Analogue? Art Museums in Digital Culture’ to signal the tension between change and continuity, between new media enthusiasms and traditional museological practices. Issues such as the use of media in the gallery centered on authority and provenance, ownership and copyright, and user engagement will also be discussed throughout the week’s programme.

Share/Save/Bookmark