Category Archives: Duveen Studio Recordings

Learning and Teaching in New Media: Questions of Literacy

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  • Richard Colson, Artist and Senior Lecturer in Digital Arts at Thames Valley University
  • Mike Philips, Reader in Digital Art & Technology and Director of i-DAT [Institute of Digital Art & Technology], University of Plymouth
  • Paula Roush, New media artist and lecturer at London South Bank University and the University of Westminister

This session will have presentations on perspectives of teaching new media and will focus upon questions of the cultural contexts of new media practices, knowledge and understanding in curricula design and teaching for interactivity.

 

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This recording is part of:

Resolutely Analogue?: Art Museums in Digital Culture
Programme B

Monday 2 March – Friday 6 March 2009

At the outset the research project Tate Encounters chose to use new media for volunteer participants to record their own encounters with Tate Britain as well as a research tool for reflexive documentation and commentary. This took the practical form of a dedicated intranet site and the use of mobile digital recording.

In using new media the project made a number of assumptions about how undergraduate student participants used new media, how this related to the ways in which a national art museum understood the potential of new media and what the use of new media might produce as research data. Having now completed two years of fieldwork, the project is now reflecting upon its initial assumptions and raising a number of critical questions which it aims to share and extend with a wider group interested in the development of new media in relationship to museums.

Some of the initial questions relate to the following:

  • To what extent does the web visitor have agency to ‘act back’ or to ‘author’ their interactions with museum websites?
  • How is new media being conceived as an ‘interpretative’ or ‘augmenting’ dimension of the museum experience and with what effects?
  • How do museums see and understand the value of the use of personal mobile media within the museum?

These questions have been grouped under the title ‘Resolutely Analogue? Art Museums in Digital Culture’ to signal the tension between change and continuity, between new media enthusiasms and traditional museological practices. Issues such as the use of media in the gallery centered on authority and provenance, ownership and copyright, and user engagement will also be discussed throughout the week’s programme.

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Digital Media Arts students from London South Bank University on the digital encounter with the museum

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Digital Media Arts Project (October 2008- February 2009)
At the end of the first year of the project it was noted that whilst participants attended workshops at Tate Britain and continued to document their experience, they made little use of the online blog. Instead they worked to the deadlines for submission to the Image/Sound/Text section of the [E]ditions online publication. The project still wanted explore what a digital encounter might be and negotiated to work with third year students on the BA(Hons)Digital Media Arts programme. Tate Encounters constituted itself as an external client commissioning a series of prototype interface portals for the Tate Encounters Online Archive. In  this session the student disscussed how they ended up on their course, their thougths on digital media and the museum via the Altermodern show next to the Duveen Studios.
To view the prototypes click here

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

to download the file to your hard drive click here

This Recording is part of:

Resolutely Analogue?: Art Museums in Digital Culture
Programme B

Monday 2 March – Friday 6 March 2009

At the outset the research project Tate Encounters chose to use new media for volunteer participants to record their own encounters with Tate Britain as well as a research tool for reflexive documentation and commentary. This took the practical form of a dedicated intranet site and the use of mobile digital recording.

In using new media the project made a number of assumptions about how undergraduate student participants used new media, how this related to the ways in which a national art museum understood the potential of new media and what the use of new media might produce as research data. Having now completed two years of fieldwork, the project is now reflecting upon its initial assumptions and raising a number of critical questions which it aims to share and extend with a wider group interested in the development of new media in relationship to museums.

Some of the initial questions relate to the following:

  • To what extent does the web visitor have agency to ‘act back’ or to ‘author’ their interactions with museum websites?
  • How is new media being conceived as an ‘interpretative’ or ‘augmenting’ dimension of the museum experience and with what effects?
  • How do museums see and understand the value of the use of personal mobile media within the museum?

These questions have been grouped under the title ‘Resolutely Analogue? Art Museums in Digital Culture’ to signal the tension between change and continuity, between new media enthusiasms and traditional museological practices. Issues such as the use of media in the gallery centered on authority and provenance, ownership and copyright, and user engagement will also be discussed throughout the week’s programme.

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Richard Morphet in conversation with Victoria Walsh

richard_mophet

Richard Morphet
Richard Morphet joined the Tate Gallery in 1966 and retired in 1998. His first appointment was as Assistant Keeper of the Modern Collection, becoming Deputy Keeper of it in 1973, and subsequently Keeper from 1986 until 1998.

 

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

to download the file to your hard drive click here

This Recording is part of: 

Education Practice at Tate 1970-present
Programme A

Monday 23 February – Friday 27 February 2009

In considering how museums have significantly reconfigured their relationships with audiences over the last decade and given how Learning as a department carries a notable responsibility in developing audiences, this series of interviews with present and past members of Tate staff aims to create an understanding and account of how Education practice within Tate has historically evolved from information and explanation to interpretation, engagement to participation, informal knowledge to professional research.

Questions to be considered in this programme in relation to Education practice are:

  • Since its inception  what are the historical legacies of the original Education Department within the operation of Tate and more recently Tate Britain?
  • Where has Education been historically positioned and now?
  • What kind of agency does Education hold within the production and reproduction of knowledge within Tate?
  • What is its relationship to a research practice?
  • How does it configure its publics?

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Helen Charman in conversation with Victoria Walsh

helen charman

Helen Charman
Helen Charman was previously Curator, Teacher Programmes, Tate Modern

 

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

to download the file to your hard drive click here

This recording is part of:

Education Practice at Tate 1970-present
Programme A

Monday 23 February – Friday 27 February 2009

In considering how museums have significantly reconfigured their relationships with audiences over the last decade and given how Learning as a department carries a notable responsibility in developing audiences, this series of interviews with present and past members of Tate staff aims to create an understanding and account of how Education practice within Tate has historically evolved from information and explanation to interpretation, engagement to participation, informal knowledge to professional research.

Questions to be considered in this programme in relation to Education practice are:

  • Since its inception  what are the historical legacies of the original Education Department within the operation of Tate and more recently Tate Britain?
  • Where has Education been historically positioned and now?
  • What kind of agency does Education hold within the production and reproduction of knowledge within Tate?
  • What is its relationship to a research practice?
  • How does it configure its publics?

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Toby Jackson in conversation with Victoria Walsh

toby_jackson

Toby Jackson
Toby Jackson joined Tate Gallery Liverpool in 1988 as the founding Head of Education and Public Programmes and a member of the Gallery’s senior management team, later becoming the founding Head of Interpretation and Education at Tate Modern in 1999.

 

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

to download the file to your hard drive click here

This recording is part of: 

Education Practice at Tate 1970-present
Programme A

Monday 23 February – Friday 27 February 2009

In considering how museums have significantly reconfigured their relationships with audiences over the last decade and given how Learning as a department carries a notable responsibility in developing audiences, this series of interviews with present and past members of Tate staff aims to create an understanding and account of how Education practice within Tate has historically evolved from information and explanation to interpretation, engagement to participation, informal knowledge to professional research.

Questions to be considered in this programme in relation to Education practice are:

  • Since its inception  what are the historical legacies of the original Education Department within the operation of Tate and more recently Tate Britain?
  • Where has Education been historically positioned and now?
  • What kind of agency does Education hold within the production and reproduction of knowledge within Tate?
  • What is its relationship to a research practice?
  • How does it configure its publics?

Share/Save/Bookmark

Andrew Brighton in conversation with Victoria Walsh

andrew_brighton

Andrew Brighton
Andrew Brighton worked for Tate between 1992 and 2002. He was Curator of Public Events at the Tate Gallery, Millbank until he moved in 1999 to Tate Modern to become Senior Curator: Public Programmes.

 

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

to download the file to your hard drive click here

This recording is part of:

Education Practice at Tate 1970-present
Programme A

Monday 23 February – Friday 27 February 2009

In considering how museums have significantly reconfigured their relationships with audiences over the last decade and given how Learning as a department carries a notable responsibility in developing audiences, this series of interviews with present and past members of Tate staff aims to create an understanding and account of how Education practice within Tate has historically evolved from information and explanation to interpretation, engagement to participation, informal knowledge to professional research.

Questions to be considered in this programme in relation to Education practice are:

  • Since its inception what are the historical legacies of the original Education Department within the operation of Tate and more recently Tate Britain?
  • Where has Education been historically positioned and now?
  • What kind of agency does Education hold within the production and reproduction of knowledge within Tate?
  • What is its relationship to a research practice?
  • How does it configure its publics?

Share/Save/Bookmark

Anna Cutler conversation with Victoria Walsh

anna_cutler

 
Anna Cutler
Anna Cutler is Head of Learning at Tate Modern and took up the post in 2006.

 

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

to download the file to your hard drive click here

 

This recording is part of:

Education Practice at Tate 1970-present
Programme A

Monday 23 February – Friday 27 February 2009

In considering how museums have significantly reconfigured their relationships with audiences over the last decade and given how Learning as a department carries a notable responsibility in developing audiences, this series of interviews with present and past members of Tate staff aims to create an understanding and account of how Education practice within Tate has historically evolved from information and explanation to interpretation, engagement to participation, informal knowledge to professional research.

Questions to be considered in this programme in relation to Education practice are:

  • Since its inception what are the historical legacies of the original Education Department within the operation of Tate and more recently Tate Britain?
  • Where has Education been historically positioned and now?
  • What kind of agency does Education hold within the production and reproduction of knowledge within Tate?
  • What is its relationship to a research practice?
  • How does it configure its publics?

Share/Save/Bookmark

Sylvia Lahav in conversation with Victoria Walsh

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Sylvia Lahav
From1987 to 1993 Sylvia Lahav was Curator of schools at the Tate Gallery, and from 1994 to 1995 she was Curator responsible for devising and co-ordinating lectures and events and for the planning co-ordination and management of a large varied programme of events, conferences, seminars. From 1996 to 1999 she became Curator of  Public programmes  at the Tate Gallery moving in 2000 to Tate Modern as part of the team established there.

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

to download the file to your hard drive click here

 

This recording is part of:

Education Practice at Tate 1970-present
Programme A

Monday 23 February – Friday 27 February 2009

In considering how museums have significantly reconfigured their relationships with audiences over the last decade and given how Learning as a department carries a notable responsibility in developing audiences, this series of interviews with present and past members of Tate staff aims to create an understanding and account of how Education practice within Tate has historically evolved from information and explanation to interpretation, engagement to participation, informal knowledge to professional research.

Questions to be considered in this programme in relation to Education practice are:

  • Since its inception what are the historical legacies of the original Education Department within the operation of Tate and more recently Tate Britain?
  • Where has Education been historically positioned and now?
  • What kind of agency does Education hold within the production and reproduction of knowledge within Tate?
  • What is its relationship to a research practice?
  • How does it configure its publics?

Share/Save/Bookmark

Tim Marlow in conversation with Victoria Walsh

tim_marlow_and_victoria_walsh

Tim Marlow
Tim Marlow began working at the Tate Gallery as a lecturer in the Education Department and subsequently move to the Communications Department where he established and edited Tate – The Art Magazine

 

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

to download the file to your hard drive click here

This recording is part of:

 

Education Practice at Tate 1970-present
Programme A

Monday 23 February – Friday 27 February 2009

In considering how museums have significantly reconfigured their relationships with audiences over the last decade and given how Learning as a department carries a notable responsibility in developing audiences, this series of interviews with present and past members of Tate staff aims to create an understanding and account of how Education practice within Tate has historically evolved from information and explanation to interpretation, engagement to participation, informal knowledge to professional research.

Questions to be considered in this programme in relation to Education practice are:

  • Since its inception  what are the historical legacies of the original Education Department within the operation of Tate and more recently Tate Britain?
  • Where has Education been historically positioned and now?
  • What kind of agency does Education hold within the production and reproduction of knowledge within Tate?
  • What is its relationship to a research practice?
  • How does it configure its publics?

Share/Save/Bookmark

Simon Wilson in conversation with Victoria Walsh

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Simon Wilson
Simon Wilson joined Tate in 1967 as Official Lecturer. He became Head of Education in 1980, Curator of Interpretation in 1991, Communications Curator in 2000, and retired from Tate in 2002.

 

Please click on the player below to listen | You can subscribe to the podcast here       

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

to download the file to your hard drive click here

 

This recording is part of:

 

Education Practice at Tate 1970-present
Programme A

Monday 23 February – Friday 27 February 2009

In considering how museums have significantly reconfigured their relationships with audiences over the last decade and given how Learning as a department carries a notable responsibility in developing audiences, this series of interviews with present and past members of Tate staff aims to create an understanding and account of how Education practice within Tate has historically evolved from information and explanation to interpretation, engagement to participation, informal knowledge to professional research.

Questions to be considered in this programme in relation to Education practice are:

  • Since its inception  what are the historical legacies of the original Education Department within the operation of Tate and more recently Tate Britain?
  • Where has Education been historically positioned and now?
  • What kind of agency does Education hold within the production and reproduction of knowledge within Tate?
  • What is its relationship to a research practice?
  • How does it configure its publics?

Share/Save/Bookmark